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**********************ATTENTION*****************************

The Scott County Sheriff’s office has become aware of another potential scam that is hit our area. The caller claims to represent Duke Energy and states the customer bill did not clear for payment and immediate payment is needed within twenty minutes so service isn’t interrupted. On several occasions the caller has spoke with a foreign accent. The scam taking place has already been attempted locally on three businesses and no known residences at this time. Please be aware and if you have any questions call your electric department before you give anyone your information. Always be aware that if it is your company that they will already have all your information and will not call you to disconnect your service first.

WE ARE HIRING!

JOB POSTING

SCOTT COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT

DEPUTY SHERIFF

 

POSITION:                Sheriff Deputy Full Time

 

WORK SCHEDULE:  (Varies / 24 Hour Public Service Operation)

 

QUALIFICATIONS: 

21 years of age; Ability to complete required Indiana Law Enforcement Academy training

and other required training as needed; Possession of a valid Indiana Driver’s License and be in

good standing with the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles.

 

APPLICATION PROCESS:        

Candidates can obtain a Scott County Employment Application and hiring process from the Scott County Auditor’s Office beginning Monday, November 13, 2017 through Monday, November 27, 2017 between the hours of 8:30 am to 4:30 pm (M-F). The Application must be submitted to the Auditor’s office by 4:30 pm on November 27, 2017.

 

Hiring Process

 

Basic Written Skills Test: After a review of applications, applicants will be contacted by phone or mail for a written basic skills test. Indiana Law Enforcement Academy Graduates will not be required to take the basic written skills test.

 

 

Scott County, Indiana is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, national origin, religion, age, or disability or any other characteristic protected by law.

OPERATION PULL OVER

                                  

 

 

 

November 9, 2017

 

The Scott County Sheriff’s Office and Scottsburg City Police warn drivers of increased traffic enforcement through Thanksgiving

 

Millions of Americans will travel our nation’s highways this Thanksgiving holiday to visit family and friends. With more vehicles on the road, the chances of being involved in a crash increase greatly.

 

The Scott County Sheriff’s Office and Scottsburg City Police are joining more than 230 local law-enforcement agencies across the state to spot violations to Indiana’s seat belt and impaired driving laws. Through the weekend after Thanksgiving, expect to see an increase in random patrols, saturation patrols and checkpoints. This overtime enforcement is supported with National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) funds administered by the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute (ICJI).

 

“Why are we advertising this enforcement blitz? To give drivers and their passengers fair warning and to make our roads as safe as possible,” said Sheriff Dan McClain. “Our officers live in the communities we serve and will be thankful this holiday if impaired-driving and unbuckled deaths never strike again.”

 

New Portable Breath Tests

NHTSA and ICJI recently announced delivery of 1,759 portable breath tests to assist 150 Indiana law-enforcement agencies in establishing probable cause when arresting drunk drivers.

 

The Alco-Sensor FSTs mouthpieces and gas canisters used to calibrate the readings were purchased with just over $750,000 in federal impaired-driving funds. The new devices include passive sniffers that can sense alcohol in the air around a person or an open container. Over the coming year, an additional $310,000 is budgeted to purchase 725 portable breath tests for Indiana State Police posts.

 

More information and list of recipient agencies is at www.in.gov/cji/files/Highway_Safety_PBT_release.pdf .

 

It’s the law

In every state, it is illegal to drive with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or higher. In Indiana, drivers under 21 with a BAC of .02 or higher are subject to fines and a license suspension for up to 1 year.

 

Indiana has a primary seat-belt law, meaning that police officers may ticket unrestrained drivers or passengers, even if no other traffic violation has taken place. In addition, all passengers under age 8 must be in an approved car seat or booster seat.

 

For more information about impaired driving visit: http://on.IN.gov/drivesober and for more information about seat belts visit http://on.IN.gov/buckleup .

 

Seat belt tips

The ICJI and Purdue University Center for Road Safety estimate that about 93 percent of Hoosiers buckle up. But the small amount of drivers and passengers not wearing seat belts made up more than half of Indiana’s fatal crashes in 2016. Below are tips for proper seat-belt use:

Secure the lap belt across your hips and pelvis, below your stomach. Place the shoulder belt across the middle of your chest and rib cage, away from your neck. Never put the shoulder belt behind your back or under an arm. If your seat belt doesn’t fit you, or you have an older car with lap belts only, ask your dealer or vehicle manufacturer about seat-belt adjusters, extenders or retrofits.

 

Motor vehicle crashes are a leading and increasing cause of death for children ages 1 to 13. Below are tips for properly selecting, installing and using child safety seats:

Choose the right car seat for a child’s height and weight at www.safercar.gov/therightseat. Use a rear-facing infant or convertible seat until a child reaches the seat’s upper height or weight limit. Rear-facing harness straps should originate at or below the child’s shoulders. And never install a rear-facing seat in front of an active air bag. Once a child outgrows a rear-facing car seat, he or she is ready for a forward-facing car seat with harness. Always use the tether strap when installing a front-facing car seat. Front-facing harness straps should originate at or above the child’s shoulders. Tightly secure car seats using either the seat belt or the lower anchors, but not both, and that they are threaded through the correct path. Make sure the straps are snug and free of twists, and that the car seat doesn’t move more than 1 inch. Buckling your child correctly is just as important as installing the seat correctly. Seat belts and harness straps should be snug and free of twists. If you are able to pinch harness straps between your fingers, the harness is not tight enough. To receive timely recall information, register your car seat with the manufacturer or using the form at www.nhtsa.gov/document/car-seat-registration-form.

 

Sober driving tips

Crashes involving at least one alcohol-impaired driver resulted in 211 Hoosier deaths and nearly 2,100 injuries during 2016. And the Thanksgiving holiday is one of the deadliest times of year.

 

With all of today’s options for getting home safely, there’s no excuse for getting behind the wheel impaired as it endangers you and everyone else around you. Law enforcement recommends these safe alternatives to impaired driving:

Designate, or be, a sober driver. Use public transportation. Call a cab or a ridesharing service. Download the SaferRide mobile app on the Android Play Store or the Apple iTunes Store. This simple app only has three options: call a taxi, call a friend, and identify your location for pickup. Celebrate at home or a place where you can stay until sober. Throwing a party? Offer non-alcoholic beverages and plenty of food. Never provide alcohol to minors. Ask young drivers about their plans. Friend or family member about to drive? Take the keys and make alternate arrangements.

 

Impaired driving is three times more common at night than during the day. If you see an impaired driver, turn off the road away from the vehicle and call 911. Signs of impaired driving include:

Weaving, swerving, drifting, or straddling the center line Driving at a very slow speed Braking erratically Making wide turns Stopping without cause Responding slowly to traffic signals Driving after dark with headlights off Almost striking an object or vehicle Driving on the wrong side of the road Turning abruptly or illegally

Sheriff Dan McClain Receives the Honorable State Health Commissioner Award

 

 

 

On August 29th, 2017, Sheriff Dan McClain received the honorable State Health Commissioner Award for excellence in public health for outstanding contributions in promoting, protecting, and providing for the health of the people of Scott County, Indiana, regardless of their circumstances.  This award was presented to Sheriff McClain by the Indiana State Department of Health by Dr. Jerome Adams, M.D., M.P.H., the next U.S. Surgeon General. 

 

The acknowledgement and appreciation for law enforcement was shared by others in law enforcement and corrections for all their efforts involving the opioid epidemic and HIV crisis in the community. 

 

“The health of the people is really the foundation upon which all their happiness and all their powers as a state depend.”- Disraeli

  

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Now Hiring Corrections Officers

NOW HIRING

 

 CORRECTIONS OFFICER

(PART-TIME)

 

The Scott County Sheriff's Office is accepting applications for Part-Time Corrections Officer Positions. Due to the need to balance officer/inmate gender ratio, we encourage both MEN AND WOMEN to apply. The 2017 Corrections Officer salary is $16.55 an hour.

 

JOB POSTING:

SCOTT COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

CORRECTIONS OFFICER PART-TIME

 

WORK SCHEDULE:  (Varies / 24 Hour Public Service Operation)

 

QUALIFICATIONS: This position will primarily be responsible for monitoring inmates, transporting and searching inmates, including the possibility of strip searches. In addition, applicants must be able to perform all essential functions of the job. A copy of the complete job description is available from the Auditor's office and may be obtained at the time of application; 21 years of age; Ability to complete required training as needed.  Possession of a Valid Indiana Driver’s License and be in good standing with the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles.

 

APPLICATION PROCESS:          

 

Application: Candidates can obtain a Scott County Employment Application from the Scott County Auditor’s Office from August 23, 2017 thru Sept 1, 2017 from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. The Application must be submitted to the Auditor’s Office by 12:00 pm on September 1, 2017.

 

Basic Skills Test: After a review of applications, applicants will be invited to take a written exam tentatively scheduled for September 9, 2017.

 

Scott County, Indiana is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, national origin, religion, age, or disability or any other characteristic protected by law.

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Now Hiring for Deputy Sheriff

 

Scott County Sheriff's Office is Accepting Applications for

Deputy Sheriff.

 

POSITION:                   

Deputy Sheriff Full Time

 

WORK SCHEDULE:  

(Varies / 24 Hour Public Service Operation)

 

QUALIFICATIONS: 

21 years of age; Ability to complete required Indiana Law Enforcement Academy training

and other required training as needed; Possession of a valid Indiana Driver’s License and be in

good standing with the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles.

 

APPLICATION PROCESS:        

Candidates can obtain a Scott County Employment Application from the Scott County Auditor’s Office from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday. Completed applications should be accompanied by a resume and must be submitted to the Auditor’s Office by 4:30 pm on August 25, 2017. A digital copy of the application can be obtained by contacting the Auditor's Office at 812-752-8408. 

 

Hiring Process

 

Basic Written Skills Test: After a review of applications, applicants will be contacted by phone or mail for a written basic skills test. Indiana Law Enforcement Academy Graduates will not be required to take the basic written skills test.

 

Physical Fitness Assessment: Applicants who receive a passing score on the basic written skills test will be invited to take a physical fitness assessment. The assessment is set to the current entrance physical fitness standards of the Indiana Law Enforcement Academy. Those entrance standards can be found on the ILEA website at http://www.in.gov/ilea/2338.htm

 

Merit Board Interview: Applicants who receive a passing score on the physical fitness assessment will be invited to an interview with Sheriff’s Merit Board. Following the interviews, the merit board will provide a list of applicants that are eligible for hire and provide that list to the sheriff.

 

Background Investigation: Those candidates on the hiring list will be given a conditional offer of employment and will be required to undergo a voice stress analysis and a background investigation. The voice stress analysis will be administered by a certified voice stress analyst.

 

Physical Exam: Candidates that pass the voice stress analysis and the background investigation will be required to undergo a physical examination by a physician.

 

Scott County, Indiana is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, national origin, religion, age or disability on the provisions of services.

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Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over Campaign

 

 

The Scott County Sheriff’s Office and Scottsburg City Police Will Arrest Impaired Drivers with National Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over Effort

 

The Scott County Sheriff’s Office and Scottsburg City Police are joining about 220 law-enforcement agencies across Indiana and thousands nationwide in the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign.

 

From mid-August through the Labor Day Weekend, police will be out in full force, arresting impaired drivers by aggressively targeting those who put lives in danger. Expect to see increased sobriety checkpoints, roving patrols and saturation patrols.

 

“If you drive impaired, our officers are trained to spot you and take you to jail. Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over means zero tolerance,” said Sheriff Dan McClain. “These enforcement efforts save the lives of impaired drivers, their passengers and others out on the road.”

 

In every state and the District of Columbia, it is illegal to drive with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or higher. In Indiana, drivers under 21 with a BAC of .02 or higher are subject to fines and a license suspension for up to 1 year.

 

A DUI arrest means going to jail and losing your driver’s license. The average DUI cost? About $10,000, including car towing and repairs, attorney fees, fines, court costs, lost time at work and other hefty expenses.

 

Indiana law-enforcement agencies have participated in the annual Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over enforcement campaign for more than 20 years. Overtime patrols are supported with federal highway safety funds administered by the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute. For more information, visit http://one.nhtsa.gov/drivesober.

 

Tips for a safe and fun season

The annual Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over enforcement campaign includes the Labor Day weekend, with thousands upon thousands of Hoosier families taking to their cars for end-of-summer barbecues, football games, lakes and pool parties. Sadly, it is also one of the deadliest times of year for impaired-driving deaths.

 

With all of today’s options for getting home safely, there’s no excuse for getting behind the wheel impaired as it endangers you and everyone else around you. Law enforcement recommends these safe alternatives to impaired driving:

 

Designate, or be, a sober driver. Use public transportation. Call a cab or a ridesharing service. Download the SaferRide mobile app on the Android Play Store or the Apple iTunes Store. This simple app only has three options: call a taxi, call a friend, and identify your location for pickup. Celebrate at home or a place where you can stay until sober. Throwing a party? Offer non-alcoholic beverages and plenty of food. Never provide alcohol to minors. Ask young drivers about their plans. Friend or family member about to drive? Take the keys and make alternate arrangements.

 

Ride Sober or Get Pulled Over

Motorcyclists have the reputation for being tough, but no one is tough enough to withstand the effects of impaired riding. Motorcycles make up about 3 percent of registered vehicles, but are dramatically overrepresented in fatal crashes involving alcohol. The more that bikers drink, the less likely they are to wear their helmets.

 

The U.S. Department of Transportation has released a new “Man in the Mirror” video with a biker judging whether he is sober enough to ride: https://youtu.be/V--qw9N00KM.

 

Report impaired drivers

Impaired driving is three times more common at night than during the day. If you see an impaired driver, turn off the road away from the vehicle and call 911. Signs of impaired driving include:

 

Weaving, swerving, drifting, or straddling the center line Driving at a very slow speed Braking erratically Making wide turns Stopping without cause Responding slowly to traffic signals Driving after dark with headlights off Almost striking an object or vehicle Driving on the wrong side of the road Turning abruptly or illegally
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Back to School Time in Scott County

 

 

Back to School Time in Scott County

 

Dear Friends,

 

Back to school time is an important event for our entire community. Students are back in class. Teachers are implementing new lesson plans for the school year. Administrators are working with budgets, school bus routes, staffing and school safety concerns. Parents are coordinating work and school schedules, car pools and support for their student’s activities and studies. Businesses are equipping families, teachers and administrators with the supplies they need for a successful school year. Back to school is a busy time for us all.

 

During this busy time, please be extra cautious in traffic. Be mindful of our school traffic zones especially during the morning hours and early afternoons. Keep an extra look out for potential hazards around our schools and in neighborhoods where children play. Slow down and increase your stopping distances.

 

School buses are back on the road. Be aware of school bus routes in your neighborhood and throughout your daily travel. Leave plenty of time and space for buses. With school traffic, anticipate delays in your travel and leave early so you’re not in a rush. And, when approaching a school zone or school bus on the road, be prepared to stop for bus and pedestrian traffic.

 

I want to thank all of you who help make our education system an integral, positive force in our community. Our children are counting on us – let’s work together to make “back to school” a rewarding, fun, and safe time for all Scott County residents.

 

Thank you,

 

 

Sheriff Dan McClain

 

   

 

 

 

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2017 Click It or Ticket Campaign Complete

 

 

The Scott County Sheriff’s Office and Scottsburg Police Department Announces End of the 2017 Click It or Ticket Campaign

 

Scottsburg, IN. – The Scott County Sheriff’s Office and the Scottsburg Police Department announced today the completion of the national and statewide 2017 Click It or Ticket enforcement mobilization campaign. During the 24 day enforcement period, 82 tickets were written for lack of seat belt usage within Scott County.

 

“Seat belts simply save lives,” said Sheriff Dan McClain. “The importance of wearing your seat belt is a priority, and this campaign expresses this message as well as making it a year-long reminder for all drivers and their occupants.”

 

Officers within the Scottsburg Police Department and the Scott County Sheriff’s Office worked 105 hours in addition to their regular scheduled shifts to provide seat belt enforcement to drive home the importance of wearing seat belts and using child restraints. Officers made a total of 14 arrests during the enforcement period. Arrests included, but were not limited to, Driving While Suspended, Operating While Intoxicated,  and Drug Possession.

 

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in 2016, 90.1 percent of drivers and passengers across the nation were wearing seat belts. Additionally, NHTSA statistics show in 2015 alone, seat belts saved an estimated 13,941 lives nationwide. In Indiana, in 2016, Indiana’s seat belt usage was 92.4 percent for all passenger vehicles.

 

“The cooperative agency commitment throughout the state with the “Click It or Ticket” campaign to encourage motorists to wear their seat belts is vital to traffic safety,” said Indiana Criminal Justice Institute Director, Dave Murtaugh. “I am appreciative of the efforts of all the participating agencies to confirm Indiana’s commitment for safer roadways.”

 

Click It or Ticket is an annual enforcement effort supported by federal highway safety funding. The Indiana Criminal Justice Institute distributes funding to more than 250 participating Indiana law enforcement agencies.

 

For more information regarding the Click It or Ticket enforcement mobilization campaign, please visit: http://www.nhtsa.gov/nhtsa/ciot/index.html. To learn more about the Scott County Sheriff’s Office, please visit: www.scottcountysheriff.org. 

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Memorial Day Message from the Sheriff

Memorial Day Travel Safety

 

Many Americans are planning to travel during the upcoming holiday weekend. A recent survey by Travelocity stated that nearly 80% of surveyed adults who said they plan to travel on Memorial Day, plan to travel by car. 2 An article by AAA states that due to the low gas prices we have seen this year, more than a third of Americans plans to take a family vacation of 50 miles or more from home this year.1

 

The following are good reminders as you prepare to take to the road during the Memorial Day travel weekend.

 

Buckle your safety belt – it’s the best way to stay safe in a vehicle and remember, the national Click It or Ticket program is in full swing over the holiday weekend

 

Put down the cell phone – nearly 10 people are killed and over 1,000 injured every day in crashes involving distracted drivers – don’t text and drive! 3

 

Don’t drink and drive – even one alcoholic drink can reduce your abilities and impair your judgment

 

Be prepared – take a map, atlas, or GPS device; make sure your spare tire is inflated and you know how to change it; have your car serviced before heading out; include an emergency kit with water and snacks in case you’re stranded for more than a few hours; refuel BEFORE your gas warning indicator displays

 

Turn down the music – hearing sirens and emergency vehicles is an important warning to slow down and drive cautiously - you may be approaching an accident scene

 

Keep your eyes on the road and hands on the wheel – eating, looking for CDs, and digging for things in the floorboard or back seat can lead to trouble

 

Get plenty of rest – make sure you’re well rested before getting behind the wheel, rotate driving duties with others in the car to avoid becoming too sleepy or distracted

 

Take frequent breaks – stop, get out of the vehicle, and stretch your legs often

 

Be courteous - because of the volume of vehicles on the road, you’re bound to run into a few traffic jams, be cut off, or be forced to stop short - remain calm and courteous - don’t let other drivers ruin your holiday

 

 

Travel safely and enjoy your Memorial Day weekend!

 

Sheriff Dan McClain 

 

 

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